How to make Seaweed & Garlic Biscuits inspired by Food You Can Forage

We’ve done it, guys. February half term has arrived, and even if you don’t have feral children to dance around this week, it means we’ve all made it through the miserable post-Christmas slump – and spring is finally on its way! The landscape is already bursting with signs of spring; our hazel trees are full of catkins and we’ve seen the first daffodils, snowdrops and primroses emerging from the soil.

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The intelligence of ravens

Three immediate truths tend to register with a person when they find themselves close to a raven.

Firstly, the sheer size of the giant corvid, which can possess a wing span of more than a metre.

Then there is the colour. Whilst from a distance the raven’s plumage appears a funereal black, up close it morphs into a shimmering pool of inky blue and brown.

Take part in the Big Garden Birdwatch!

This weekend is the RSPB’s Big Garden Birdwatch. There’s still time to register online for this year’s event, and help provide the RSPB with important information on how the UK bird population is doing. It is simple and enjoyable – and a great excuse to watch your garden birds from the comfort of your living room! 

Here are five things you may not know about hares

To the people of rural Britain, hares are deeply beloved, perhaps above all other animals. But how much do we know about these elusive creatures? Marianne Taylor, author of The Way of the Hare, illuminates some of their lesser known traits.

The launch of the Arabic Birds of the Middle East

Early March and Richard Porter is on the edge of the Arabian Gulf, the strong sunlight sparkling on the khors, mangroves, deserts and Dubai’s dramatic skyline. He is at the annual Emirates Festival of Literature to talk about bird conservation in the Middle East, take a wildlife walk for children and, especially, to launch the Arabic Birds of the Middle East.

Why We Should All Garden for Wildlife

The fact that you’ve clicked on this blog post probably means you have a good idea why you want to garden for wildlife – or indeed why you already do. But it is still worth reminding ourselves why it is such a good thing to do. For some, it is about the sheer, simple joy of watching living things – connecting with nature, if you like – right on your doorstep.

CUCKOO – HARBINGER OF SPRING AND CHEAT

Cuckoos are on the way! Satellite tagging by the British Trust for Ornithology has revealed their extraordinary journey. Cuckoos spend the winter with lowland gorillas in the African Congo rainforests. They leave in early March and fly to West Africa, where they fatten up in preparation for the crossing of the Sahara. They then endure a 50-60 hour non-stop flight over this vast desert. After recuperating on the shores of the Mediterranean, they continue north through Europe, reaching Britain towards the end of April.

Red dragons

Could today be the start of dragonfly and damselfly season? asks David Chandler…   April 17th. That’s my earliest date for seeing a dragonfly or damselfly in the UK. It was 2011, I was in Devon, and the record-breaking beast was a Large Red Damselfly. This species is normally the opening act of the dragonfly season. Most Large Red Damselflies emerge over a three-week period in the spring, though some emerge later and the further north you are the later they are likely to emerge. This is an easy species to identify –… Read More

An Underwater Walk in a Beech Woodland

Easter holidays are here, take the chance to get out and about in a woodland near you. Tessa Wardley describes a recent trip: I’m crouched down leaning against the smooth bark of an old Beech tree, it is a rare sunny day this winter and I’m hiding, as part of a game of ‘thicket’. I’m well hidden by the girth of the tree even in my layers of down jacket and I peer up to contemplate the canopy that reaches invitingly over my head. At this time of year there is little leaf cover but if I close my… Read More

Puffins pummelled by winter storms

Euan Dunn, RSPB’s Principal Marine Advisor and author of the new RSPB Spotlight: Puffins, looks at the effect of winter storms on Puffins. We have heard a great deal, and rightly so, about the massive impact that a seemingly endless conveyor belt of Atlantic storms had on the Somerset Levels and elsewhere on land. But the waves as tall as church towers that battered the coast were, beyond the scope of telephoto cameras, meanwhile wreaking havoc on seabirds out at sea. The scale of the damage inflicted, especially on Puffins, is only… Read More